via darksilenceinsuburbia:

Molly Landreth

Embodiment: A Portrait of Queer Life in America

1. Ducky and Her Friends, Cedar Rapids, IA. 2007 

2. Ashley, Jackson, MS. 2009 I think about my life and how hard it is to be a loud mouth, out of the closet, black lesbian living in the south and how I wouldnt change it for the world. - Ashley

3. Cat and Brittany, Iowa City, IA. 2009 I gave you my heart six years ago and you have cradled it more gently than I have. I promise to hold your heart, your hand, and your body with love and respect and joy yesterday, today and tomorrow. - Cat speaking to Brittany during their wedding ceremony which was held the day after this photograph was taken.

4. Charlie and Honey, Seattle, WA. 2005

5. Cooper, Oakland, CA. 2009 At the second this image is captured, however, I am beaming from the inside out. Cant recall what nudged me toward this moment of joy. But I am grateful for the reminder. - Cooper

6. Gary and Jeremy, Brooklyn, NY. 2005

7. The Jentlemen of Distinction, East Saint Louis, MO. 2009 Being a Jentlemen is about hard work, dedication and being a family. These are my BROTHERS, no matter whatâ?¦. I am PROUD to be a Jentlemen. I hold my head up high and proud! - Dusty of The Jentlemen of Distinction

8. Nomy, Oakland, CA

9. Chickadee and Her Family, Concrete, WA. 

10. Jesus, Dallas, TX. 2009 Thank you so much for doing this project as well as allowing me to become a part of it. You guys came into my life during a chapter of my metamorphosis where I felt that I had no chance at life and I have found an immense source of inspiration from you alls presence. - Jesus 

(via dapperandswag)

via mrkcy: The world is filled with happiness, glory, achievement, but there is no denying the pain of the struggle, the truth of the disappointments nor the reality of the obstacles. You do not make an apple of a stone by painting it red.

via mrkcy: The world is filled with happiness, glory, achievement, but there is no denying the pain of the struggle, the truth of the disappointments nor the reality of the obstacles. You do not make an apple of a stone by painting it red.

(via blackfashion)

“White Americans take a stunningly Pollyannaish view of inequity, despite worsening income and wealth gaps, a black male unemployment rate double that of white males, continuing job discrimination, disparate prison sentences for non-violent drug offenses, and Obama-era efforts by Republican-dominated state legislatures to limit voting rights. In a Pew survey on the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, only 13 to 16 percent of white Americans saw racial unfairness in workplaces, schools, health care, restaurants, or elections.”

White Americans take a stunningly Pollyannaish view of inequity, despite worsening income and wealth gaps, a black male unemployment rate double that of white males, continuing job discrimination, disparate prison sentences for non-violent drug offenses, and Obama-era efforts by Republican-dominated state legislatures to limit voting rights. In a Pew survey on the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, only 13 to 16 percent of white Americans saw racial unfairness in workplaces, schools, health care, restaurants, or elections.”

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ferguson

The Price of Blackness: “That a police officer then shot him dead and left his body in the street is, historically, the kind of thing police officers do when black men stand up for themselves…We know that what happened to Michael Brown was not a unique incident but part of a larger phenomenon—and that it will happen again, soon. Which means we know an even deeper truth: that to be black in this country means constantly paying a tax on your life. Some of us pay in dignity, some of us pay in blood. What I’m trying to say is this: Never again will I pay with my dignity.”

The Price of Blackness: “That a police officer then shot him dead and left his body in the street is, historically, the kind of thing police officers do when black men stand up for themselves…We know that what happened to Michael Brown was not a unique incident but part of a larger phenomenon—and that it will happen again, soon. Which means we know an even deeper truth: that to be black in this country means constantly paying a tax on your life. Some of us pay in dignity, some of us pay in blood. What I’m trying to say is this: Never again will I pay with my dignity.”